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Augmented Reality (AR): The Future of Education

Augmented Reality (AR) is quickly becoming the digital economy’s latest trend. It can be defined as enhancing the real world by overlaying digital information and media, such as sound, video, graphics or GPS data, in real-time. In simple terms AR is making something “come to life.” Essentially, a mobile device is held up to an image, referred to as a trigger image, and it creates an alternative virtual reality on the device.

AR is being implemented into various different sectors of Canada’s economy. Subsequently, bringing it into the education system is important. With AR’s consistent progression, students currently attending secondary school may come into contact with it by the time they reach post-secondary education, and/or their careers.

Furthermore, we are overcome with a culture of digital natives who are fully submerged in modern technologies. Smart phones, tablets, laptops, and web browsing are introduced to children very young. Each new generation is becoming more and more reliant on these technologies, incorporating them in every aspect of their lives.  Thus, implementing AR into education is not just to keep students up to speed with Canada’s rapidly growing economy, but also it is vital in order to nurture the learning curriculum with modern technologies. It is important to adapt to these advances by finding new ways to interactively engage with students.

Bringing AR in the classroom ultimately increases students’:

  • Knowledge base
  • Learning cycle
  • Participation
  • Overall interest in the learning content
  • Retention rates
  • Intellectual curiosity

ICTC is looking further into AR and ways it can be applied in high school classrooms through their Future of Interactive Learning (FOIL) initiative, which is fostering its’ use through the exploration of Canada’s history. For more information visit: http://www.ictc-ctic.ca/foil/


FUNDING PARTNERS

ICTC’s Future of Interactive Learning initiative is made possible with project funding from the Canada Media Fund (CMF).